My husband, the philanthropist

Despite the fact that I have a sign on our screen door that says “No Solicitors,” some brave (or illiterate) soul came a-knocking tonight and managed to get my husband to commit to donating $10 a month to a “worthy” cause. (It would’ve been $25 a month, but I told him absolutely not. I actually said something along the lines of “You can give him $25 total, but not $25 a month.” You can see where that got me.)

I don’t have a problem with supporting worthy causes, in fact, I’d be all for it – IF and ONLY IF we had the money to spare. We are hard-pressed enough living on one income, owning only one car and trying to pay off debt. There are so many causes I’d love to support, but I tell myself that someday (when I’m better off), I will do so. Right now, however, we need to take care of our family.

So what is this worthy cause you ask? It’s a good one, I admit it. The group is called “Environment Colorado.” They’re currently lobbying against the oil companies who want to do clear-cutting of trees so they can drill for oil. Definitely a worthy cause. I certainly don’t want to see our forests depleted. But can our family afford to save the trees? I don’t know.

Maybe I’m over-reacting. It is, as my husband says, “ONLY $10 a month.” Perhaps that isn’t more than we can afford. Maybe I can just have him cut back on his lunches out a couple times a month to pay for it. (He rarely eats his lunch out, but on the days we don’t have leftovers ready to take, it does occasionally happen.) ;) Yes, I think that should cover it nicely.

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12 thoughts on “My husband, the philanthropist

  1. Grrrr. They frustrate me. I think it is beacuase I feel guilty even though I couldn’t possibly afford to contribute to everybody who asks. Then I get angry because someone’s made me feel this irritating guilt.

    Like r2ks, I give when I can to what has impacted me personally. Then I brush off my hands and get back to being my usual poor self.

  2. I’m more likely than my dh to donate, although I’ve gotten much, much better about turning folks down when it’s not something we feel strongly about. Most of our donations over the past year or so have been political in nature. :)

  3. I don’t know if it’s against the law or not (and I’m certainly not going to prosecute anyone – LOL), but I am curious if it is.

    I put up the sign originally largely because of the guilt thing. I would love to give money to support every band/choir member, Girl Scout (especially since I was one through 12th grade!), soccer player, Democratic party members, save-the-world-causes, etc., but I just can’t. And I feel badly when I have to say “Sorry, I can’t right now” or I would dig into my purse for the last $2 and then feel angry at myself afterwards that I couldn’t just say no. So I was hoping to spare myself some grief w/ the sign.

    The funny thing is, I remember going door-to-door as a child selling Girl Scout cookies or other fund-raising items for Catholic school and seeing “No solicitor” signs and ringing the doorbell anyway because I had no idea what “solicitor” meant at that age. So I don’t mind it so much when the kids still come to the door because I’m sure they don’t know what it means. But certainly most adults should. Anyway, I’ll get off my soapbox now. ;)

  4. Hey, I’m just tryin to help save the world. I want forests for my grandchildren to hike in.

    I also have ulterior motives. Every time I walk down “The Mall” I have to dance around the Environment Colorado people with their clip boards, now I can smugly say “Oh I gave at home.” and not dart away in shame.

  5. Door-to-door is definitely the most difficult to turn down. I admit that I have just ignored the doorbell (when I didn’t recognize the person standing there). I understand your point of view; we, too, are on a limited budget. At least it is a worthy, local cause that will impact your daughter’s future.

  6. Sabrina, It totally cracked me up when I was Googling the legality of solicitors and signs…I’ve taken to writing the signs around my house in English AND Spanish, just to be sure.

  7. I cracked up at the sign too. Thanks for sharing it. :)

    Sorry I’ve been so scarce lately. I have so much going on between Ava’s party and some other things I’m involved with. Eep! Probably won’t be blogging much for the next few weeks.

  8. That sign is awesome! I’m a bit stunned that they have 2 responses to it. This solicitor was a rare one, we don’t get many… usually it is some pre-teen hispanic kids carrying around a Rubbermade bin with a bunch of crap to sell.

    I think our simple No Solicitors sign usually works. The wooden door was open, they could see in, I think he saw an easy mark… I was probably drooling and presenting myself a bit to easily.

    I have, in my youth, invited the the xtians into my home before and then turned the table on them. It is fun to start trying to get them to apply logic to their beliefs, though it usually ends badly.

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