thoughts on Blogher and being proud

I’m sitting here at the computer with a sleeping Julian on my chest, while two men from South Africa clean out the air ducts in my house. Ava and Grandma left for a few hours to go to the library and buy material to make clothes for her baby “Trajan” and to get away from all of the noise. I figured I’d use this time to catch up on some Group Talks on Maya’s Mom and I came across some posts about Blogher, specifically the upcoming annual Blogher conference which is in July this year in Chicago.

I never gave any thought to attending the conference before, even though I’ve been blogging for over 2 years now, but after reading many women say what a great time they had in the past and how they are planning to return this year, I started wondering if it might be something I’d like to do someday.

My reading on Maya’s Mom lead me to Elizabeth’s blog Table for Five, specifically this post about her experience at Blogher ’06 and some things she took away from the closing session.
She wrote:
“1. Find your voice.
2. Stop apologizing. Be proud of who you are and what you do.
3.Stop hesitating. Move yourself forward.
4. You ARE worthy.”

Those things really hit home for me, especially the part about “Stop apologizing. Be proud of who you are and what you do.” and “Stop hesitating. Move yourself forward.”

There are sometimes things I want to write about, but don’t for fear of offending someone, somewhere. Or if I do write about something controversial, like circumcision, I’m so careful to be as politically-correct as possible, that I feel like I’m walking on eggshells. But then I wonder, why is it my responsibility to protect people? It’s my blog and I should be able to write or not write about whatever I want. If people chose to read it, that is their prerogative, and if it bothers or offends them, they have the option to stop reading it.

I admire the bloggers (and several come to mind) who lay it all out there and say whatever the hell is on their mind, without regard for who it might upset. They are proud of who they are what they do. They don’t apologize for sharing THEIR thoughts on THEIR blog. I respect them for being true to themselves.

While I don’t imagine I will make it to Blogher this year, maybe I will make it a goal to go next year. It sounds like a very empowering and fun conference to attend. Maybe I can talk a few of my friends turned bloggers to go with me. (Hint, hint – you know who you are – Nicole, Heather, Julie, Sonja…) And in the meantime, I’m going to try to be more true to myself in my blogging and speak my mind. I am proud of who I am, so why should I be so afraid to put myself “out there”?

======================================

And now for a “shout out.” Thank you Caroline, for including my blog among the five blogs you recommend. I think it’s awesome that you choose to read my blog even though it’s far removed from the world you are familiar with. :) Thanks for your open mindedness.

Related Posts with Thumbnails

13 thoughts on “thoughts on Blogher and being proud

  1. Thank you for the link! I am so glad that my post helped you think about why you blog and who you blog for-ultimately, it has to be you!

    I hope you do go to BlogHer in 2008 so we can meet. And please tell your commenter “totaltransformation” to visit http://blogher.org to register for the conference-EVERYONE is invited!!

  2. Boy, do I totally understand wanting to infuse more honesty and questioning and conviction into writing. I wrote about this very thing last year:
    http://leighsteele.wordpress.com/2006/08/03/nice-part-ii/
    I haven’t mastered it by any means, but people like you continue to help me move along that path.
    Thank you for that. :)
    Keep up your writing…and please, YES!, I for one would love to hear your passiationate convictions, whether I agree with them or not.
    Thinking women we all are.
    XOXO

  3. I too, hesitate at times to write on some subjects…I know my family reads my blog, and don’t they say never to discuss religion or politics with family? Does that apply to blogs? Anyway, maybe I’ll become more “brave” in the future too, and if someone doesn’t like what I write, feel, or think, the mouse is only a click away. :-) The conference sounds like fun- maybe we could go next year. :-)

  4. gosh, this hits home with me too. I know my family reads it a lot, allthough they don’t comment or email me to this fact, i just “hear” through the grapevine. I would like to be a little bit more out there and I need to stop feeling like my blog is a “service” to my family, but instead my own “self expression”.
    Thanks as always Amy, I definitally know why your blog has so much attention, always something to ponder from you!
    OOh, and the blogger conference sounds like a blast!! 2008??

  5. thank you all for your feedback and encouragement. :)

    totaltransformation – invitations aren’t sent out – everyone is invited to attend. :) go here for more info and to register – http://blogher.org. and welcome to my blog!

    leigh – thanks for sharing that link. great post! it’s right on with how i’m feeling.

    amama and sonja – yeah, that’s part of what i struggle with too – family reading my blog. it’s hard because i don’t want to upset anyone, but also – like sonja said – our blogs don’t exist as a service to our families, but as a creative outlet for us. it’s hard to find the right balance.

  6. i soooo have those feelings every time i want to write a controversial post. because my first and foremost goal in life is service, and in many ways service through writing…i never know what my boundaries should be? should my service be raw honesty? or subtle and careful yet to the point? i often fear i will offend people…this is such a vice/virtue for me because I so care about others feelings and never want to repel a reader, but I also need to tell it how i see/feel it and to be careful may mean dancing around a very important subject. i am a very opinionated person on things like breastfeeding, the medicalization of birth, sex, religion, politics…but i still don’t speak my full mind on them all. part because i don;t have the skills yet, and part because i am scared to really open those doors.
    thank you for this thought provoking post…it’s something i think of often and i am glad i am not aone. maybe we should challenge eachother and write one post, totally honest, totally raw…and see what happens!!!

    peace.
    mb

  7. My blog, as you know, is an “up” kind of place, not anywhere near being a controversial one… but i so love visiting ones that offer opinions with passion!! Passion for whatever is important to that particular blogger, be it family, food, life, animals, athletics, parenting, sexuality, linguistics, art, celebs, politics, etc. Each blog has its own flavor. Sort of like the world!

  8. Here is a quote that I have on my “About Me” page, that a counselor shared with me many years ago. It is good for me to re-read, when I feel like shrinking back. Hope it helps. :-)

    Our deepest fear is not that we are inadequate. Our deepest fear is that we are powerful beyond measure. It is our light, not our darkness, that most frightens us. We ask ourselves, who am I to be brilliant, gorgeous, talented, and fabulous? Actually, who are you not to be? You are a child of God. Your playing small doesn’t serve the world. There’s nothing enlightened about shrinking so that other people won’t feel insecure around you. We are all meant to shine, as children do.

    Marianne Williamson

  9. A friend of mine who also blogs tells it like it is for her world – she certainly is not confrontational in stating her strong opinions but she certainly invites debate.

    Some people thrive on throwing tough subjects out there because they love to argue – they all should have been lawyers! Others of us (like myself) avoid debate like the plague. It’s because society is so quick to condemn someone with a different value or opinion than our own and the anomyninity (sp?) of the internet makes people more viscious than they would be face to face. I think that visciousness is what makes some of us shrink back in not speaking about what we really think. That and I myself don’t have as thick a skin as people like my opinionated friend.

    I’m never going to please everybody, but a thicker skin will make the nasty comments bounce back and I think that in the end my opinions will be respected more. ;)

  10. Pingback: more on putting myself 'out there' « Musings of a crunchy, domestic goddess

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>