Up to my ears

PushedI’m up to my ears in books that I want to read. The priority is going to “Pushed: The Painful Truth About Childbirth and Modern Maternity Care” because I’m picking that one up from the library today and will only have three weeks until it is due back. It’s been on hold for me since Friday, but I haven’t been able to get over there to get it yet. Well, that’s not entirely true. The kids and I went to the library yesterday to return some books and hang out, but found it closed for Veteran’s Day. Shucks. Anyway, I can’t wait to get my hands on that book. You can be sure it will work it’s way into a future blog post.

The other two books I bought and have waiting for me are “Connection Parenting: Parenting Through Connection Instead of Coercion, Through Love Instead of Fear” – which came highly recommended by a friend, and “Mothers and Daughters: Loving and Letting Go” – recommended by a different friend. Both of which look like they will be helpful in my relationships with my children as well as with helping me deal with some issues from my own childhood. It’s amazing how much baggage we can carry with us from our own childhoods into parenting our children. There are so many things that I thought I’d swept under the rug and forgotten about that have resurfaced since I had kids of my own. Hopefully these books will facilitate the healing process.

It seems there are so many good books out there that I’d like to read, and never enough time to do it. I need to find a way to set aside regular time for reading or else find a way to download the information from the books directly into my brain. Wouldn’t that be something? :)

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8 thoughts on “Up to my ears

  1. Pingback: all books » Blog Archive » Up to my ears

  2. I hear ya! I have so many books to get to. I’m reading one for my blog and an upcoming giveaway, then I have 3 from the library and an herb book I bought 2 days ago that I just can’t wait to get to!

  3. I read the reviews for Pushed on Amazon.

    It is funny, being from Ethiopia where there is high maternal mortality related to birth, it is hard for me to think about the negatives of a highly managed birth.

    In my mind, I can only think about all the women that die or physically get injured because they didn’t have a hospital to help in case of a complication.

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