Women’s issues, rights and equality

With the Democratic National Convention wrapping up last night and Women’s Equality Day, marking the 88th anniversary of women gaining the right to vote, celebrated on Aug. 26, women’s issues have been a hot topic lately.

Kristin at Candy Sandwich received a work email Tuesday “from the Assistant Administrator of Diversity or something like that” announcing Women’s Equality Day. She notes, “For the record, I’m not sure I feel all that equal but that’s another story, for another time. I definitely don’t feel any more equal today than yesterday or last week.” Kristin goes on to wonder, even though she received an email “from the Assistant Administrator of Diversity or something like that,” just how Women’s Equality Day was supposed to be celebrated at her work.

In some of the buildings around here, we barely have bathrooms but as the current president proclaimed yesterday, in declaring the day, “I call upon the people of the United States to celebrate the achievements of women and observe this day with appropriate programs and activities.”

Bring on the appropriate programs and activities.

What were the “appropriate programs and activities?” Did you attend any? Do you know of any that took place?

Barbara from Looking 2 Live commented on Kristin’s post and remarked, “I always hate these ‘special’ days because they point out the fact that equality still doesn’t exist! For the life of me, I don’t see why there ever needed to be inequality. Maybe some day we will rise above things like gender and race. Not yet, however.”

Ashley at Let Me Entertain You is concerned about women’s rights and wrote yesterday about a proposed regulation by the Department of Health and Human Services “that could seriously undermine access to basic reproductive health services, including birth control and abortion.” In her post, she links to the ACLU where you have until Sept. 20 to publicly comment against the proposal by filling out a form.

I intend to do that just as soon as I finish this post and I encourage you, if women’s rights are important to you, to do that same.

Over at The Fashionable Bambino is a post about the Holistic Moms Network who is concerned that “Women’s Rights to Natural Childbirth Are Rapidly Disappearing.” HMN will be organizing a bunch of events around Labor Day to raise awareness a woman’s right to choose where and how she gives birth.

HMN is throwing its support behind Birth on Labor Day or BOLD – a global arts-based movement founded in 2006 by playwright Karen Brody. BOLD aims to inspire communities to create maternity friendly childbirth choices for mothers through presentations of Brody’s play “Birth.” The play tells the birth stories of eight women and paints an alarming picture of how low-risk, educated mothers are giving birth today. Over 100 performances of the play are happening in cities across America in September (see www.boldaction.org). Proceeds from the play are donated to local organizations that provide mother-friendly maternity care, in line with the Mother-Friendly Childbirth Initiative.

You may well know that I’m a big advocate for women’s right to choose where and how they give birth and I am always glad to read of others joining in the fight to preserve that right.

At RH Reality Check, Allison Stevens is keeping a close eye on the Democratic National Convention and asks, “Will Michelle Obama be women’s rights activists best friend in the White House since Eleanor Roosevelt?”

As I reported in Women’s eNews, Obama says her top concern is issues facing women in the workplace — that is, pay discrimination and difficulties women have balancing the demands of work and family.

I agree that it would be wonderful to have a first lady championing for women’s rights.

Over at The Political Voices of Women, guest blogger Deb Della Piana from Turn Left asks women to Use Your Brains, Don’t Vote for McCain.

John McCain is no friend to women. … What really matters is the position of the presidential candidate. Casting your vote for McCain rather than Obama, out of some twisted sense of loyalty to Hillary Clinton, makes absolutely no sense. For the record, Hillary Clinton feels that way too. If, however, you want to set women’s rights back a few decades then pappy McCain is your man and the Republican party is your ticket.

Speaking of Hillary Clinton, Pundit Mom live-blogged HRC’s powerful speech on Tuesday and there are over 50 comments from BlogHers with their reactions to it.

All of this goes to show that even though Tuesday was “Women’s Equality Day,” and we should definitely be thankful to all the women who came before us and made great strides to get us where we are today, we still have a long way to go until we will be truly equal.

Cross-posted yesterday on BlogHer

(FYI I wrote this before McCain had chosen Sarah Palin as his VP, which is why she isn’t mentioned in the article. That very well may be a post for another day.)

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8 thoughts on “Women’s issues, rights and equality

  1. One of the things that has been so frustrating to me this political season was how bad Hillary was treated in the media. I see that as a reflection of how society in general views women. When reporters are allowed to call her a bi**h and get away with it, that isn’t right.

    I have to say, that I am very happy to see a woman VP pick. I think it goes a long way in breaking through that glass ceiling that was talked about so much last week. I am surprised it came from the Republican side, but honestly, it is about time a woman can hold one of the top jobs in our government.

    No matter who ends up being elected, it is great to see so many barriers in regards to race and gender, finally being broken down during this election.

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  3. Ashley, Rebecca Walker has stated that the Daily Mail article you linked to is “an inaccurate tabloidization of an interview I gave”. Source: http://tinyurl.com/5gxxst

    However, even if were completely accurate, I also don’t think you can condemn an entire movement based on one woman being a terrible parent, even if she was one of the “leaders” of the movement. There are plenty of people in all kinds of social and political movements who are bad wives, husbands, friends, parents, and children, just because they are, not because it has anything to do with their ideals.

    Most feminists I know would be appalled at someone acting the way Rebecca Walker describes her mother behaving. It is not feminism to neglect one’s children.

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