A naturally beautiful rainbow of colors

For the second year in a row, I made our Easter egg dyes out of foods and spices. This year’s dyes were made from the following ingredients:

Pink – canned beets
Orange – chili powder
Yellow – tumeric
Green – spinach with tumeric and purple cabbage mixed in
Blue – purple cabbage

I have to say I’m quite pleased with how they turned out. :) Yes, it was another year of mommy having more fun dyeing the eggs than the kids. But the kids had a great time finding the eggs (over and over again) in our Easter egg hunt, so it all evened out. ;)

Here’s my best shot for this week – a rainbow of eggs:
2009's batch of naturally-dyed Easter eggs

Want to know how I did it? Check out my tutorial on dyeing Easter eggs naturally.

I’m also fond of this picture, which isn’t my usual style, but I liked the motion blur of the kids off to find more Easter eggs while daddy paused to recall exactly where he hid them all. This so perfectly represents life in our home on most days.

The kids look for more eggs, while daddy ponders where he hid them all.

For more Best Shot Monday pics, visit Mother May I.

The dangerous overuse of antibiotics and creation of superbugs

For nearly the past month, my family and I have been battling a doozy of an upper respiratory infection, also known as a cold or the flu. It started with my daughter and quickly spread to my son and husband and finally to me all within about a week’s time. The coughing, the phlegm, the runny nose, the aches, the fever, the gastrointestinal issues – we shared it all. Isn’t family great?!

Throughout the several weeks of what was pretty much hell for me, all I wanted was something that would make it all better – a magic pill, an elixir, anything. Yet as I had suspected, when I saw the doctor (both for myself and later for my son), she confirmed that it was a viral infection not a bacterial infection, which means antibiotics won’t do a darn thing to make it better. (More about virus vs. bacteria.) With viral infections, you just need to wait out the illness (usually one to three weeks) and do whatever you can to make the symptoms more bearable – drink lots of liquids, get lots of rest, etc. I was disappointed there was no quick fix (it’s seriously hard to care for your sick family when you feel like the walking dead yourself), but I accepted it and focused on doing what I could naturally to help us all feel better.

It seems not everyone is as accepting of a viral diagnosis as I was. According to the blog Antibiotic Misuse and Resistance, “Seven out of ten Americans receive antibiotics when they seek treatment for a common cold!” because the patient “pressures the doctor into prescribing an antibiotic to get a quick fix to his/her illness.” The problem with this, of course, is that “antibiotics won’t cure a cold because colds are caused by viruses, not bacteria.”

The overuse of antibiotics is a real problem. Jane Collingwood from Psych Central notes in The Common Cold: Facts and Myths, “antibiotics usually do not help a cold. Antibiotics work against bacteria, while most colds are viral.The overprescription of unwarranted antibiotics has caused our bodies to develop antibiotic-resistant bacteria. When you really do have a bacterial infection, antibiotics may not be able to treat it. They may actually make colds worse by killing the ‘friendly’ bacteria and creating an environment more hospitable to the virus.”

If that doesn’t convince you and you are still wondering why you can’t take an antibiotic “just in case,” here’s why.

There are big problems with the cavalier use of antibiotics. When bacteria are exposed to an antibiotic, while many are killed, subsequent generations of others may develop characteristics that allow them to resist being killed. While the antibiotic kills off the weakest bacteria, antibiotic resistance allows the stronger, resistant bacteria to continue multiplying. The eventual result can be “superbugs,” which are very hard to kill and may only succumb to extremely powerful antibiotics. Such antibiotics pose a greater risk of significant side effects that may require hospitalization and are much more costly. Some superbugs go on to cause devastating and even fatal infections that are incurable with current antibiotics.

Another tip to remember that’s helpful in preventing superbugs is that if you are prescribed an antibiotic for a bacterial infection, be sure to take the full course of it as directed. “Don’t stop the medicine just because you begin to feel better. Not taking the entire prescription may allow resistant bacteria to thrive and not be completely killed off.”

Nurse Barb sums it all up nicely when she says, “the next time you go to see your health care provider and they tell you that you don’t need an antibiotic, be grateful, this could ultimately save your life in years to come.”

Some of the things I did for myself and my family that helped us deal with our virus were:

  • Cut out all dairy products (to reduce mucus) and greatly reduce sugar and flour consumption
  • Drink a lot of fluids, especially hot tea with honey (honey has been proven effective in treating coughs, especially in children though should never be given to children under 1 year old)
  • Use a vaporizer or humidifier at night
  • Eat a lot of homemade chicken noodle (or rice) soup
  • Rest as much as possible
  • Spend time in the steamy bathroom to help break up phlegm
  • Normally I prefer using cloth handkerchiefs (better for the environment), but I finally broke down and started using disposable tissues so we wouldn’t reinfect each other with dirty hankies lying around the house
  • Use a neti pot to clean out the sinuses (BlogNosh has a humorous tutorial on how to use a neti pot)
  • Frequently wash hands with regular soap (not antibacterial) and water
  • Use herbal and homeopathic remedies

More tips can be found at the Crunchy Bunch for treating colds naturally and Kelly the Kitchen Kop has a list of Home Remedies for a Cold & Ear Ache / How to Avoid Colds, Flu, Ear Infections & Antibiotics.

Disclaimer: Please note that I am not a doctor, nor am I giving medical advice here. If you or your child is sick, I recommend visiting your doctor to get the correct diagnosis and then using your best judgment.

Cross-posted on BlogHer

How to dye Easter eggs naturally – a tutorial

So you want to dye your Easter eggs naturally – without chemicals and artificial colors? While it takes longer than the commercial egg dye kits you buy at the store, dyeing your eggs with natural foods is better for you and your child(ren)’s health, produces much more interesting colors and is, quite arguably, more fun!

Why dye with natural colors instead of artificial?
According to Organic.org, “Many food colorings contain color additives such as Red No. 3 and Yellow No. 5, which, according to a 1983 study by the FDA, were found to cause tumors (Red No. 3) and hives (Yellow No. 5).” I wrote about the drawbacks of artificial colors a while back if you’d like to read more on the topic.

It is more time-consuming than using a store-bought conventional egg dye kit (and I highly recommend preparing the egg dye baths a few hours before you plan to dye the eggs with the kiddos), but it is healthier for your kids and the environment. “Dyeing eggs the natural way gives you the opportunity to spend more time with your family, teaching kids to use alternative project methods that are healthier for them and the environment.” I think it will be a lot of fun and a great family project.

To get started you will need:

  • Hard boiled eggs (preferably white eggs since they take on the dyes better than brown eggs)
  • Ingredients to make your dyes, which I will discuss in more detail below – As a guideline, use up to 4 cups for vegetable solids and 3–4 tablespoons for spices per quart. Mash up fruits.
  • White vinegar (2 Tablespoons for every quart of water)
  • Several pots and bowls
  • Optional: stickers, rubber bands, and crayons for decorating the eggs and making interesting patterns
  • Egg cartons for drying the dyed eggs

Natural egg dyes can be made from a variety of ingredients. Here’s a list of what I used last year along with comments on the colors that resulted.

RED

  • 3 cans of beets in cranberry juice (instead of water) – produced a dark reddish hue

PINK

  • Frozen cherries – made a very light pink

RED-ORANGE

  • 3 tablespoons of chili powder produced a nice reddish-orange color

YELLOW

  • 3 Tablespoons of tumeric produced a great yellow

GREEN

  • A mix of spinach leaves, canned blueberries and their juice and a few tablespoons of tumeric produced a gorgeous earthy green color – I think it would work without the spinach leaves, but I happened to have some that were wilting so I threw them in.

BLUE

  • 3/4 of a head of red cabbage (chopped) made a beautiful blue

GREY BLUE

  • 2 cans of blueberries and their juice made a grey-blueish color

GREY

  • Frozen cherries mixed with blueberries yielded a grey color (not the purple I was going for).

Instructions:
Last year I found a couple great web site with tips on “Natural Easter Egg Dyes” and Natural Dye from Organic.org. The natural dyes come from spices like paprika, tumeric and cumin; vegetables like spinach and red cabbage; fruit juices and even coffee. All of your dye ingredients can (and should) be composted after you are done.

On Organic.org, there is a boil method (which produces darker results) and a cold-dip method, which is suggested for children or if you plan to eat the eggs, which is the method we used last year.

The two methods are:

Method 1—Hot
Place eggs in a single layer in a large, nonaluminum pan. Add the dyeing ingredient of your choice—it’s best not to mix until you are comfortable with experimenting. Cover the eggs and other dyeing “agent(s)” with one inch of water. Add 2 tablespoons of white vinegar per quart to help the color adhere to the egg, and bring to a boil. Next, simmer for 20–30 minutes or until the desired shade is achieved. If you cook the eggs longer than 15 minutes, they will become rather tough.

Method 2—Cold
The cold method is the same as the hot method with the following exception. Once ingredients have simmered 20–30 minutes (depending on desired shade), lift or strain the ingredients out of the water and allow the water to cool to room temperature though you may wish to try keeping the ingredients in the colored water to give the egg more texture as the dye will become concentrated in areas where the vegetable touches the egg. Submerge the eggs until the desired color is achieved. You may keep the eggs in the solution overnight as long as it is refrigerated.

The longer the egg stays in the dye, hot or cold, the deeper the hue will be. Using vinegar will also help the color deepen.

Definitely feel free to experiment and try out other foods and spices. For me, that was a big part of what made it so much fun, trying out different things to see what colors would come from them. For example, the dye from the spinach, tumeric, blueberry mix looked orange or brown, but the eggs came out green! And the red cabbage dye was purpley-pink, but the eggs came out blue. It was like a fun science experiment that the whole family could get involved in. Happy egg coloring! :)

Pictures:
The process of making the dyes:

The egg dyes on the stovetop Beets in cranberry juice
Red cabbage Tumeric

And the results:

Red and pink eggsYellow and orange eggs
Green eggsBlue eggs

Links to other people’s natural egg dyeing results:

If you dye your eggs naturally and blog about it, please leave me your link and I’ll add it to the list. :)

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Why buy the cow? Here’s why!

I’ve decided I’m over getting chickens for my backyard. Sure, eggs would be nice and chickens would be fun, but eggs aren’t THAT expensive to buy at the store or even from the local farm down the street.

What’s really been bothering me lately however is the price of organic milk and cheese. I love that we get our milk delivered right to our door, but it’s costly and it’s not raw, and really I’d like to have raw milk. Also the cheese I buy at Vitamin Cottage or through our local co-op is not exactly cheap either.

So I’ve been doing some research the past few weeks and, while this totally wouldn’t be legal in my city, I’m going to give it a shot and buy a Shetland Cow! It’s like a Shetland Pony, but it’s a cow. The breed is mostly brown with white spots and has a little mop of hair up top. They only grow up to three feet tall and weigh about 200 lbs when full-grown. They also only produce about a quarter as much milk as a full-sized cow, but I figure for our family of four, that will still be plenty. Since they look rather like a large breed of dog, I am pretty sure our neighbors won’t even notice, so I’m not too worried about being turned in to animal control. Oh, and they are great with kids. :)

We will get our Shetland Cow, which Ava has already named “Pony” (because the first time she saw one she didn’t believe us that it was a cow), this weekend. We’re picking it up from a farm about 25 miles from here. Pony is only 3 months old, so still is quite small at this point and can easily fit in the back of our Forester for the drive home. I can’t wait! :)

The best part about owning a Shetland Cow is tricking all of your friends. ;) April Fool’s! :) Did you really think I would buy a cow and give up on chickens that easily? Here’s the really funny part. I honestly thought the idea of a Shetland cow was totally a joke, but apparently (now that I really am looking into it), miniature cows do exist and even Shetland cattle! Apparently, the joke is on ME! Anyway, I’m not getting a mini cow (of any type), but I am long overdue for writing a post to update you all on the chicken happenings in town. It’s finally legal (for 50 permit holders). More on that later. Hope you all have a fun April Fool’s Day! :)